#HelpingIsHealing

How to Recognize and Overcome Trauma

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Psychological trauma impacts many of us—it is estimated 70 percent of adults in the U.S. will experience some type of traumatic event in their lifetime, with 20 percent going on to develop post-traumatic stress disorder after the fact. 

Trauma is an emotional response to a negative event. The effects of trauma can be overwhelming and difficult to understand and move on from. Because trauma can be so hard to process, it’s often difficult to understand the full impact it has on our lives. Click here to read more…

Autistic Communication Differences & How to Adjust for Them

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It’s now clear to me that allistics communicate in a totally different way compared to how we autistic people do.  I saw a report about how autistics communicate well between themselves, and my first thought was, No shit, Sherlock.

I feel like an outsider in the neurotypical world because I process things in a different way; conversely you will feel the same in our world.  Our issue is we are not understood and are a minority.  We’re not without tact and grace, it’s just that we have a different internal “code” about what it means to communicate and relate. Click here to read more…

The Healing Power of Compassion

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Several years ago I made a conscious decision to grow. Not a garden full of tomatoes, or my bank account, or my hair. The focus has been on one very specific muscle, which really isn’t a muscle at all, but I like to think of it that way. Compassion. It’s right next to the heart muscle. Not really. But for argument’s sake, let’s say it is. I want to grow this in a big way. I want it to be so large I’ll have to give it a name and buy it a wardrobe. Click here to read more…

Groupthink: When One Mind Gets Lost in Many

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The group of college age boys and girls began to gather in a circle and chant, fists thumping towards the sky, “shots, shots, shots.” Over and over in a chorus. They circled the boy in the middle, a child no older than 18.

He stared at the row of shots in front of him, already wobbly from a night of partying. The chorus grew louder. He took all five shots, wincing between gulps. The room grew fuzzy and he wobbled out of the house and stumbled back to his dorm. The next morning, he was discovered dead in his room. He had aspirated on his own vomit. Click here to read more…

Five Ways to Cultivate Courage

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Courage is the savior that marches alongside us when fear shows up. It can inspire bursts of boldness that help us speak our minds, follow our hearts, and bare our souls to others. Without it, we can’t grow or thrive. 

Sometimes we get caught up in the mistaken notion that being courageous means overcoming fear. But courage isn’t looking past fear; it’s recognizing and even embracing it. Recently I’ve witnessed this seeming paradox in families affected by the unspeakable trauma of losing a child to a mass shooting. Click here to read more…

10 Things To Know If You Love Someone With PTSD

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Post-traumatic stress disorder is a mental health condition that can be triggered by experiencing or witnessing something traumatic. Many people think of PTSD as a disorder that only military veterans deal with, but it can also occur in reaction to other distressing events like sexual violence, a physical assault, childhood or domestic abuse, a robbery, the sudden death of a loved one, a terrorist attack or a natural disaster. Click here to read more…

How To Talk To A Child About Mental Illness

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Explaining mental illness to a child can be a bit challenging. Young children don’t understand depression or anxiety as adults do and it can be difficult to find the words to explain it to them. As a result, many parents opt not to bring up the issue reasoning that it’s better not to confuse or stress their kids. Click here to read more…

Compassion fatigue hits not only professional caregivers. Other people get it, too.

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My lifelong friend Vicki had finally hit the wall. For a long time, she’d tried to lighten the load of a friend who was facing a terminal illness. “As she got sicker, I tried to relieve every burden I could imagine,” Vicki, 61, who asked that her last name not be used for privacy reasons, told me recently. “I figured that compared to what this family was going through, no service I could offer would be too much for me.” Click here to read more…